Tal R Guilty Pleasures

The painter talks to Mark Rappolt about pleasure, mystery and what the picture doesn’t show you

By Mark Rappolt

Venus, 2017, pigment and rabbit skin glue on canvas, 122 × 88 cm. © the artist. Courtesy the artist and Victoria Miro, London The pleasure, 2017, pigment and rabbit skin glue on canvas, 97 × 132 cm. © the artist. Courtesy the artist and Victoria Miro, London Allenby, 2017, pigment and rabbit skin glue on canvas, 240 × 188 cm. © the artist. Courtesy the artist and Victoria Miro, London   Paris Chic, 2017, pigment and rabbit skin glue on canvas, 172 × 200 cm. © the artist. Courtesy the artist and Victoria Miro, London   Chez La Souris, 2017, pigment and rabbitskin glue on canvas, 240 × 200 cm. © the artist. Courtesy the artist and Victoria Miro, London Babylon, 2017, pigment and rabbitskin glue on canvas, 200 × 244 cm. © the artist. Courtesy the artist and Victoria Miro, London

It’s not often that you hear ‘pleasure’ mentioned in the context of contemporary art these days. Somehow, in these times of refugee crises, the rise of various forms of radical nationalism, the discourse of politics degenerating into an exchange of insults, the natural environment becoming less and less natural, if not gradually destroyed, and the gulf between rich and poor ever increasing, the notion of contemporary art being a source of pleasure (rather than critique or reflection) seems unfashionable, untopical…

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