Olafur Eliasson

Martin Herbert talks to the Danish-Icelandic artist, whose socially and environmentally responsible practice continues to offer new ways to measure and exploit the impact of contemporary art

By Martin Herbert

Riverbed, 2014. Photo: Anders Sune Berg. Courtesy Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Humlebæk. © 2012–14 the artist Inside the Horizon, 2014. Photo: Iwan Baan. Courtesy Fondation Louis Vuitton, Paris all works © 2012–14 the artist Model Room, 2003. Photo: Anders Sune Berg. Courtesy Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Humlebæk. © 2012–14 the artist Loading ice at Nuuk Port and Harbour, Greenland Photo: Group Greenland. © 2012–14 the artist Little Sun, 2012, in use. Photo: Studio Olafur Eliasson, Berlin & Copenhagen. © 2012–14 the artist

Let’s get this out of the way: Olafur Eliasson’s studio is big. Sprawling over four floors of a redbrick former brewery in Prenzlauer Berg, Berlin, it’s – well, here are some scale markers. “This is the canteen; they published their own cookbook,” says the Danish-Icelandic artist as we glide through the space where his team, which numbers upwards of 80, takes a communal information-sharing lunch every day. (The book is the covetable TYT [Take Your Time] Volume 5: The Kitchen,…

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