Rebecca Horn

Gesine Borcherdt talks to Rebecca Horn, one of the most influential, yet relatively overlooked, artists of her generation

By Gesine Borcherdt

Metamorphoses Between Rock and Butterfly, 2014. Photo: Jason Wyche. © 2014 the artist / VG Bild Kunst / ARS. Courtesy Sean Kelly, New York Unicorn (film still), 1970, wood, fabric, metal. © 2014 the artist / VG Bild Kunst / ARS. Courtesy Tate, London Buster’s Bedroom (film still), 1990.  © 2014 the artist / VG Bild Kunst / ARS. Courtesy the artist Ballet of the Woodpeckers, 1986 (installation view, Theater am Steinhof, Vienna). Private collection. Photo: Gérard Zugmann.  © 2014 the artist / VG Bild Kunst / ARS Revelation of a Tree, 2014. Photo: Jason Wyche. © 2014 the artist / VG Bild Kunst / ARS. Courtesy Sean Kelly, New York

When someone moves back to their place of childhood late in life, it is certainly not because she has put it behind her. Especially not if that someone is Rebecca Horn. The woman with the saffron-red mane stands in a courtyard among a mix of buildings; her wide, black clothes flutter like feathers in the wind. In 1990, the now seventy-year-old returned to her father’s former textile factory in the Odenwald mountains in Germany in order to gradually transform it…

Want to read more?

As an unregistered user you can view 5 articles per month.

You can register free to get a further 15 free articles

and access to 2 digital editions per month

or subscribe for unlimited access

If you have already signed up access you account here