Turner Prize 2017

J.J Charlesworth argues that the annual prize is showing its age

By J.J. Charlesworth

Lubaina Himid, The Fashionable Marriage, 1987, installation view. Image: David Levene Lubaina Himid, Swallow Hard: The Lancaster Dinner Service (detail), 2007. Image: David Levene Hurvin Anderson, Is it OK To Be Black? 2016. Image: David Levene Rosalind Nashashibi, Electric Gaza, 2015, installation view. Image: David Levene Rosalind Nashashibi, Electric Gaza, 2015, installation view. Image: David Levene Andrea Büttner, Turner Prize 2017 installation view. Image: David Levene

A female British prime minister being courted by an American president? It may be the most abrasive, political work in this year’s Turner Prize exhibition – which for the fifth time in its 33-year history is being presented outside London, at Hull’s elegant Ferens Art Gallery – but Lubaina Himid’s A Fashionable Marriage, from 1987, is also the oldest work here, alongside work by fellow nominees Hurvin Anderson, Rosalind Nashashibi and Andrea Büttner. A stage-set of crudely comedic cutout figures…

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